OUR AMBASSADORS

These are the words from one of our amazing ambassadors Rosie. The script has been left exactly as written by Rosie’s own request.

 

“Hi I’m Rosie, I’m 18 years old, I look like an ordinary 18 year old girl. I act , talk and do what any other 18 year old girl would do, but my life isn’t as simple it is sounds or looks. But that is the important thing about FASD. So Iike I said I can do everything that people my age can do but what people dont know who don’t noe me  is that I really struggle to do those things! Like waking up every morning People without FASD get up and do their daily routine, but when I wake up I have 10 million thoughts running through my head the minutiae my eyes open, what mood am I going to be i today. what is everyone going to think of me today? What if I make a mistake today? what’s my health going to be today?

These are just a few that I can name! Not only does it effect my daily life it effect relationships, my career because some days you could be perfectly fine and the next you could pushing everyone away from you by the way you behave not because you internally mean it but because you just dont understand like others without FASD! But it’s not all doom and gloom! Some days I could wake up and I am in the bestist of moods, bouncing of the walls, energetic there is so many different aspects of FASD within a person who has got FASD.

I have been lucky to not have been effected bad by alcohol unlike my brother who unfortunately has been. Like I have said I can still go out on my own shopping or to the cinema or to the pub on Friday night. But with doing that I have to make sure I am well prepared so if I’m going to be using public transport I have to have it printed out or on my phone so I can look at it all the time so I don’t work my self up when I’m doing the journey because I feel like I will get lost even if it is a routine I have done 7/8 times before I still have to have that reassurance that I won’t be getting lost and getting my self in a muddle, because that the other thing once I have worked myself up and stressed myself out I struggle very hard to get myself out of that moment!

 

But people with FASD, can be some of the most amazing people, they are talented, creative, determined, friendly and willing.

I studied performing arts at a college for 2 years and it wasn’t the best not because I don’t enjoy it but because I never have believed in my self that I can achieve, and it wasn’t till I went and done auditions for professional performing arts colleges and I got a place at my 1st choice that it sunk in that I can achieve if I do it! So through out growing up I was always needing guidance and motivation from my foster parents to help me achieve in what I had a passion for. I was always needing self asteem to make me understand no matter if you have a disability or not you are just a capable as those without a disability! I hope what I have said today has given you a little insight on what my life is like with FASD and that it’s sometimes a disability is hidden.

Thank you for listening.”

FASD Awareness are strongly committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and vulnerable adults.

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Our thanks go to The Kent Reliance Provident Society Fund and The Hurst-Brown Family Fund for their generous support, both kindly administered by Kent Community Foundation. 

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FASD AWARENESS is an independent charity registered in England and Wales. Charity No: 1176933.